Covid-19 cases near 4 lakh in Bangladesh

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Dhaka, Oct 25: Bangladesh on Sunday saw further  spike in Covid-19  cases as the health authorities of the country detected 1,308 new patients across the country in 24 hours, taking the total to 398,815.

During the period, 23 more patients died from Covid-19, raising the death toll to 5,803.

Besides, the total recoveries from coronavirus have jumped up to 315,107 with recovery of 1,544 patients from the disease during the period.

The fatality rate in Bangladesh is 1.46 percent, the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) said.

The daily infection rate on  Sunday was recorded 11.78 percent upon testing 11,103 samples in 24 hours. 17.67 percent of the tested 22,57,589 samples so far have turned out to be Covid-19 positive.

The recovery rate has climbed to 79.01 percent in Bangladesh, the health authorities said.

Bangladesh is seeing 2341.75 infections, 1850.24 recoveries and 34.07 deaths per million.

Currently, there are 77.907 active cases in the country.

Of the total victims, 4,471 are men and 1,332 are women. Of the latest 23 victims, 19 are aged above 50 years, three between 41 and 50 years and one other is aged between 31 and 40 years.

So far, 2,995 people have died in Dhaka division, 1,154 in Chattogram, 370 in Rajshahi, 464 in Khulna, 197 in Barishal, 241 in Sylhet, 261 in Rangpur and 121 in Mymensingh.

Across the country, 12,104 people are now in isolation and 39,731 in quarantine.

Bangladesh reported its first cases on March 8. The number of cases reached the 300,000-mark on August 26. The first death was reported on March 18 and the death toll exceeded 5,000 on Sept 22.

Global situation

As the coronavirus pandemic wreaking havoc worldwide, the number of confirmed cases globally surpassed 42.5 million on Sunday, according to data by Johns Hopkins University (JHU).

Till now, 42,532,198 people have been tested positive for Covid-19 while 1,148,943 deaths have been reported so far, according to the JHU data.

The United States has witnessed the highest numbers in deaths due to Covid-19 as the country’s total death toll counted 224,771 followed by Brazil, India, Mexico and the UK.

The US has registered 8,571,943 cases till date.

Besides, India, which has been counted as the second worst-hit country in number of cases, has recorded 7,814,682 cases as of Sunday morning, according to the data.

The South Asian country has recorded 117,956 deaths so far.

Brazil is the second country in the world in number of deaths from Covid-19, behind the United States, and third in number of cases, behind the United States and India.

The country reported another 432 deaths from the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) in the last 24 hours, bringing the total number of deaths to 156,903, the government announced on Saturday.

According to the Ministry of Health, 26,979 new cases were registered in the last 24 hours, bringing the total to 5,380,635.

The state of Sao Paulo, the most populated in the country, has also been the most affected, with 1,089,255 cases and 38,726 deaths, followed by Rio de Janeiro, with 298,823 cases and 20,171 deaths.

Since early September, the country has seen a decline in the number of cases and deaths. According to the latest figures, the average number of deaths from the virus in the last week fell to 471 per day, the lowest average since May 7.

Russia registered 16,521 Covid-19 cases over the past 24 hours, slightly down from the record high of 17,340 a day earlier, the country’s Covid-19 response center said on Saturday.

Russia’s cumulative number of coronavirus cases has grown to 1,497,167, including 25,821 deaths and 1,130,818 recoveries, the center said in a statement.

Moscow has seen a spike in Covid-19 infections, tallying 4,453 new cases over the past day, bringing the city’s total to 391,361.

Russia has been witnessing a steep growth in Covid-19 cases over the past weeks, after many restrictions were lifted and people resumed gathering in large groups.

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