Covid-19: 1,472 cases detected, 31 die in 24 hrs in Bangladesh

4
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •   
  •  
  •  

Dhaka, Oct 12: Bangladesh’s coronavirus caseload stood at 379,738 on Monday with the detection of 1,472 new cases in 24 hours until morning.

Health authorities also announced 31 more deaths during the period, taking total fatalities to 5,555.

With 1,531 patients recovering during this period, the total recoveries from coronavirus shop up to 294,391.

The fatality rate in Bangladesh is 1.46 percent, said  a handout of the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS).

Bangladesh reported its first cases on March 8. The number of cases reached the 300,000-mark on August 26. The first death was reported on March 18 and the death toll exceeded 5,000 on Sept 22.

So far, 20,84,222 samples have been tested and 18.22 percent of them have turned out to be positive.

The recovery rate has climbed to 77.52 percent in Bangladesh, the health authorities said.

Bangladesh is seeing 2,229.73 infections, 1,728.60 recoveries and 32.62 deaths per million.

Of the total victims, 4,275 are men and 1,280 are women. among them, 24 are aged above 50 years.

So far, 2,829 people have died in Dhaka division, 1,117 in Chattogram, 359 in Rajshahi, 449 in Khulna, 193 in Barishal, 238 in Sylhet, 252 in Rangpur and 118 in Mymensingh.

Across the country, 12,771 people are now in isolation and 40,646 in quarantine.

With everything returning to normal and people not following recommended health guidelines, it is feared that there could be a spike in new cases in the coming weeks. There is an apprehension that Bangladesh may witness the resurgence of Covid-19 cases in the coming winter.

Last month, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina ordered the administration to prepare to face the field-level situation if the second wave of Covid-19 pandemic hits the country in winter.

Last week, Health Minister Zahid Maleque said the second possible wave of coronavirus could be avoided if people properly maintain the health hygiene rules.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •   
  •